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Wikipedia: My Hometown

Example Web Site and/or Technical Equipment Required

Website: https://www.wikipedia.org/

Website Example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

More Ways

Computer(s), Internet access, projector, PowerPoint or other presentation software

Activity Description

For this oral presentation, students practice present and past passive verb forms by talking about their hometowns or birthplaces (It is called..., It is known for..., etc.). For information that is unknown (such as what is produced there), students can use Web sites such as Wikipedia to find the information.

Preparation

  1. Teach present and past passive verb forms and allow students plenty of written and spoken practice.
  2. Download the My Hometown Presentation Prompt file (Example Word Document, above), modify it as desired, print, and photocopy for your class.
  3. Choose which Web sites you will have students use (Wikipedia  or Simple English Wikipedia ), depending on their level of English, and make sure that the sites are not blocked at your school.
  4. Make a sample visual aide / slideshow about your own hometown or birthplace to show students as an example or use the Example Document-Sample Hometown PowerPoint Presentation, above. Decide which presentation software (PowerPoint, Prezi, or Google Docs presentation) and make sure that you are comfortable enough with the program to show students how to use it and that it is installed on the computers students will use.
  5. Alternatively, you could have students print out images from the Internet and create poster presentations.

How-To

  1. Distribute the My Hometown Presentation Prompt. Have students answer these questions about their hometowns on the presentation prompt handout. As needed, let students use Wikipedia or Simple English Wikipedia to find answers to the questions. To use these sites, provide students with the link(s) and have them open the site(s) in their browsers. Demonstrate how to type in the name of a town or city to find information on location, place of interest, monuments, landmarks, geography, products, wildlife, etc.
  2. Collect students' writing and provide feedback on their sentences (grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc.).
  3. Have students choose which sentences / information they will include on their visual aides and in their presentations.
  4. Show students how to use PowerPoint (see sample) or other presentation software to prepare a visual aide with a title, map, and images.
  5. With you projecting students' slideshows, students can make their oral presentations about their hometowns or birthplaces to the rest of the class.

Teacher Tips

  • If you decide to have students use Microsoft PowerPoint, it may be helpful for students who are not familiar with the program to use a template you create and have available to them for download or ready on the desktops of the computers students will use. That way, students need only to type in key information and insert images.

More Ways

  • Students can find pictures and maps of their hometowns on Wikipedia and attribute them to the site. Google Images  may be used to find other pictures for the visual aide for this presentation as long as these presentations will not be posted on the Web. Otherwise, you will need to be careful of copyright rules and possibly choose only Creative Commons licensed pictures, which are okay to use.

Documents

Levels

  • Advanced

Standards

Basic Communication

  • (0.2) Communicate regarding personal information

Basic Communication

  • (7.2) Demonstrate ability to use critical thinking skills
  • (7.4) Demonstrate study skills
  • (7.7) Demonstrate the ability to use information and communication technology
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OTAN activities are funded by contract CN200091-A2 from the Adult Education Office, in the Career & College Transition Division, California Department of Education, with funds provided through Federal P.L., 105-220, Section 223. However, OTAN content does not necessarily reflect the position of that department or the U.S. Department of Education.