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Curriculum Offers: Skills for the Nursing Assistant

The Skills for the Nursing Assistant course teaches the language and academic skills to help learners successfully communicate with patients and co-workers on the job. This course is ideal for students with English skills that are High Intermediate and above, and in fact, is helpful to all learners who are preparing for a career as a Certified Nursing Assistant or other jobs in the health care field.

Register now for the Skills for the Nursing Assistant course to start studying for free!

The current course offerings include:

Unit 1: Effective Communication

Unit 1 Effective Communication

Identify and practice effective communication skills when meeting patients. Practice asking permission and making polite requests. Learn the Opening Procedure of all Core Skills

Unit 2: Nonverbal Communication

Unit 2 Nonverbal Communication

Identify nonverbal cues in client and CNA communication. Practice the use of going to and will for explaining procedures and making offers. Learn and talk through the Core Skill of assisting patients to ambulate with a transfer belt.

Unit 3: Communication Barriers

Unit 3 Communication Barriers

Identify communication barriers. Identify the meaning of idioms and multiple meaning words. Identify and talk through the Core Skill steps for returning a person to bed.

Unit 4: Communication Strategies

Unit 4 Communication Strategies

Identify good communication strategies for use with clients and supervisors. Identify and practice appropriate phrases for clarifying and confirming instructions. Identify and talk through the Closing Procedure of all CNA Core Skills.

Contact OTAN by email: support@otan.us or phone at 916-228-2580 for more information.

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OTAN activities are funded by contract CN180031 from the Adult Education Office, in the Career & College Transition Division, California Department of Education, with funds provided through Federal P.L., 105-220, Section 223. However, OTAN content does not necessarily reflect the position of that department or the U.S. Department of Education.